Wednesday, 16 March 2011

Is This What A Feminist Looks Like?

This feminist wears: A handmade blouse (because feminists aren't afraid of enjoying traditional female pursuits) with Kate Moss at Topshop shorts and vintage suede boots (both car boot sale purchases)
Who knows? I'm a feminist and this is how I choose to present myself to the world. I dress in a way that makes me feel fabulous and confident. If others don't approve that's their problem, to me feminism is about celebrating womanhood and having the freedom of choice our grandmothers' never had.


I delight in wearing hot pants, short skirts, pink, bows, frills and high heels. I wear my hair long, paint my face and nails and adorn my body with jewellery. I'm a feminist and I rejoice in having been born a woman. We are only on this planet for a short while, we should grasp life with both hands and dress in celebration of the time we have.


Many years ago I was corporate hospitality manager with a large team of staff, a huge budget and responsibility for catering to the needs of over two thousand clients. Whenever a stranger paid a visit to my office more often than not they'd address their queries to my assistant. Was it my high heels, long hair and make-up that made them think that I wasn't the manager? No, of course not, it was simply the fact that my assistant was male. What good would chopping my hair, eschewing makeup and wearing sensible shoes have done? I was born a woman and embrace my femininity. I never heard of a man compromising his image to be taken seriously and, as equals, neither should we as women.



People often ask if there is a relevance for feminism in these days of supposed equality? Things have definitely moved on since my mother discovered she was pregnant with me back in 1966 and was forced to marry for convention's sake. As recently as the early 1980's my fellow classmates and I  campaigned for the right to wear trousers to school and trouser suits weren't considered acceptable office wear as recently as the mid-1990's when I received an unofficial warning for daring to wear such an outrageous item in the workplace.

Yes, things have moved on. I can openly live with my partner and choose not to marry or have children without being pilloried or made a social outcast. I am free to travel, vote, drive and have the same educational and career choices available to me as my male counterparts but inequality continues to rear it's ugly head.

The most obvious incident of blatant discrimination I have experienced was in 1991 after being sexually assaulted. On reporting the incident to the police I was told that I was a very attractive woman and asked if I was wearing something provocative to cause a man to act in such a way. Would a male victim be subjected to such an accusation? I think not. My attacker was swiftly caught and brought to justice. I have no idea how the police handle such matters these days, I'd like to think they are more enlightened because until women can walk the streets dressed however they want without fear of molestation we will never be entirely equal.


Phew! A very wordy post today. Click on this link to Mrs Bossa's blog to check out the other contributors.


88 comments:

  1. Vix I cant believe the police said that to you!!!! No form of dress signals it is ok to assault someone, even if you had been dressed like Jordan!!! I am so annoyed by that I cant actually remember what I was going to say now, but anyway you wonderful in the hotpants x

    ReplyDelete
  2. That is awful what the policeman asked. How is taking care of your appearence asking to be sexually attacked? Women should be able to wear whatever they want. If that is a miniskirt and high heels then so be it.
    Sophie
    x

    ReplyDelete
  3. wow, your post is awsome, I enjoyed every word! You are really a strong and independent person and it is so great that you encourage to dress like a woman and to have fun with beeing a woman! Wishing you all the best :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. I read all through this post thinking that I don't consider myself a feminist at all - I don't feel the need to, I've never felt disadvantaged for being female and I love being a woman and wouldn't swap it for anything - but then I was born a bit later than you and some of the issues you mentioned were never an issue for me.

    Then I got to the bit about the policeman asking if you were provocatively dressed and it reminded me of a few incidents where I've been groped on dancefloors in clubs. I will always ALWAYS turn around and confront whoever has done this (verbally or physically depending on how much I've had to drink) and am always shocked when I get a reaction like "It's only cos you've got such a lovely bum!" - like, do they expect me to melt at a compliment like that? Maybe some women still do, and maybe I am a feminist after all.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh, Vix, this post is fantastic. You're an inspiring woman in many ways, but I particularly love your take on this topic - love the part about enjoying being a woman and embracing our feminine selves! AND, what's more, you look ace! Thanks so much for joining in. Xxx

    ReplyDelete
  6. Dearest Vix, very well said!! You're fabulous.

    I can't believe the police said that! Good for you reporting it.

    I'm so glad things have moved on too. And you look amazing in those shorts. Much love, C xx

    ReplyDelete
  7. Beautiful post, Vix. You and I think very much alike, although I am not quite as courageous about colors and mixing as you are. But that's just because my style is a little conservative and bashful, not because I'm not glad to be a woman and am afraid to savor my options.

    Thank you for sharing your background about your old work environment, the trouser issues, and the sexual assault. God, I hope a woman today, in a first-world country, would not be asked such a question. I hope we *have* come a long way in the past 20 years.

    A technical note: your link on Mrs Bossa's list went back to Mrs Bossa's own entry. Can you resubmit, so others can find your great writing?

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love this post Vix, it just emphasies how fabulous and feisty you are x

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well said Vix. I am and will always be a feminist, whether I'm wearing jeans and trainers or a 50s frock. Whether I'm making dinner for my husband and family or buying a round at the bar. I'm sorry to hear about your experience and the attitude of the police. If one in four men could expect to experience some sort of sexual assault I imagine attitudes would change pretty damn quickly - as would conviction rates.

    Looking finer than La Moss in those shorts!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I agree so much with you, because I think we need to be alert and express our disapproval everytime inequality rears its ugly head! (love how you've expressed it!)
    And I think you're right, life is short, so enjoying every second is one of my priorities!!, and love your confident spirit and your short pants style with booties!
    besos

    ReplyDelete
  11. love the blouse, i saw a rather similar one recemntly on the high stret, and just had a momentary panic that you had become a high-street shoppper!! :)
    what the police said to you is entirely unacceptable, as has been said!
    i'm not sure i would call myself a feminist at all, and i certainly don't think we live in an equal world..

    ReplyDelete
  12. I'm a feminist. I was brought up in an era when women were automatically expected to cook, clean etc whilst men didn't lift a finger. I never thought that fair. I'm for equal opportunities. NOT for 'having it all' - because that's impossible. But the right to make choices and have a good life on your own terms and use your skills the way you want.

    Women the world over are oppressed/bullied/beaten. Never take freedoms for granted.

    ReplyDelete
  13. It’s so fascinating to learn more about you, you are a true inspiration, and such a fabulous role model.
    The assault incident sounds dreadfully awful and I feel sad that this happened to you, but it really does highlight how wrong the world is at times xxx

    ReplyDelete
  14. *This* is exactly why it bewilders me that so many people seem to think feminism has served its purpose. We may have got some very necessary legislation on the books, but cultural shifts take much, much longer to happen and are still very much needed.

    And I think this is the first time I've commented here, but I've been reading for a while - your individualism and amazing spirit totally shine, and I love that you celebrate yourself so well. You're inspiring.

    ReplyDelete
  15. It enrages me when 'work coaches' (often mistakingly thinking I'm sitting in as someone needing coaching not a manager checking whether they're good value) patronisingly inform me that I should lower my voice and change my hair so as not to be (and I quote) 'treated like a little girl' and thus not promoted.

    It's fairly funny when they discover that I am a manager, funny voice and all. But sadly ironic that they - in the name of so-called empowerment- encourage women with attributes of women to change these so they can be 'taken seriously'. I raised this point once and got a garbled woolly-logic answer I would accept from one of my youngest students. It's simple: equality means that however you look and sound, your brains and efforts matter. That is all.

    Bit deep for a fashion post... loving the hot pants on you, BTW.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Its amazing to think of the changes that have gone on over the last few decades. Its shocking that even so recently as 1991 you were questioned like that but i do beleive alot of people still think that way and its so wrong x

    ReplyDelete
  17. Fabulous post Vix, yes I can believe the police said that to you as I have heard similar comments under totally different circumstances. Once again you look fabulous, love the shorts and that paisley top is gorgeous.
    XXX

    ReplyDelete
  18. Also i just wanted to say thank you for the lovely comment you left for me x

    ReplyDelete
  19. You are such an astounding woman,and a fine example of the breed!
    Bloody coppers,that's appalling to have asked that.
    This is a stunning post,beautifully written!
    I adore you!
    Helga xxxXXXxxx

    ReplyDelete
  20. What a fantastic post Vix. Isn't it amazing how a woman can be treated. I still hear said that I only do well because I smile sweetly or bat my eye lids. It drives me dotty! Do they not realise women work hard too!

    As for the police, unbelievable! Sorry to hear about your ordeal. We should all be able to express ourselves in what ever outfit we see fit.

    Truly an inspirational post from a very inspirational woman!

    Loads of love x x x x

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi my dear- a very wise and inspirational post, you look truly amazing, thats a really hot outfit and every woman should be able to dress how they want without judgement, intimidation or harassment and be treated with equality and respect-in an ideal world this should definitely happen. xxx

    ReplyDelete
  22. Fabulous post! I am a feminist, and I wear 50s clothes, waist cinchers, and other things perhaps considered not feminist wear! I believe feminism is in the mind not in how we look, so i'm with you.

    I've also worked in a LOT of male dominated industries and had the same experience, and also when you do stand up and express yourself you're considered scary, you just can't win sometimes!

    Your experience with the police is horrible! I do hope they've moved on.

    My worst experience of sexism was when I worked as a contractor with the Navy, I heard of unbelievably sexual conversations which were had about me, I was interviewed by a panel yet none of my male counterparts were and there was some covert bullying too not direct, but they would take apart stuff in the room I was working in when I wasn't there, silly boys!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Great post, hun! I think the justice system still have similar views, sadly. One of my students was raped after a night out and was TOLD (not asked) that her outfit and behaviour probably caused it and this was 3 years ago. Today I was in town and the sales people in department stores kept stopping me to ask me if I wanted to try their face creams etc. They never stop men, do they? Maybe I looked particularly haggared today, eh? xxx

    ReplyDelete
  24. I have always worked in IT. Back in the late 80's my department manager came in and announced we were going to IBM for a meeting. I was wearing black tights, a short gray wool skirt and super colorful scarf. I told him I'd have to go home and get a blue suit. He told me no way. He didn't warn me in advance because they needed to be shook up and realize that people were different and not all women were in clerical positions or needed to dress like a man if they weren't. When we got there, and they asked him all the technical questions, he smiled and said "those are questions for the techie to handle." I guess we can credit some men for letting us be "square pegs."

    ReplyDelete
  25. These are the reasons why I like your blog and YOU! YOu say what what you want to without any fear! It was a great read Vix. I can see we as women have come a long way but yet have quite a distance to cover. And how to I express my feminism? But just being who I am whether males (or females) like it or not!

    Tanvi
    from © tanvii.com

    ReplyDelete
  26. Your experiences and strong, well-thought out opinions combine with your bold and beautiful fashion sense to make you a unique and wonderful woman. I'll never tire of you.

    Your beautiful mind is equal to your choice of clothing and surroundings.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Very well-said. we are who we are and we should not change to fit other people's idea of us. Even now, in India, if you are eve teased its becoz u were dressed provocatively and asking for it!! I hate such narrow-minded assholes but how much ever I rant, they never change:-(At least, in my country, it will be years before man and woman are treated equally..

    ReplyDelete
  28. Loved your post and totally agree with your interpretation of feminism! Thank you for your self disclosure and your beautiful self expression!

    ReplyDelete
  29. well said, live life without compromise is my motto, and say thankyou when a gentleman opens the door for you.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Vix, post like this and outfits like this one is the reason why I adore you and your blog!!!
    As a latina women; I that grew up in a lovely but very role oriented household. The men were able to do whatever they wanted and the women were the ones doing most of the work and dealing with most of the problems and taking the most crap!!!
    I was never submissive, always had a big mouth and I was always criticized and make fun of the way I dressed, how I decorated my space, how I styled my hair and the list goes on and on...
    I consider myself a stylish feminist!!
    I love clothes, makeup, nail polish, accessories, dying my hair, accentuating my curves and looking outside as good as I feel inside!

    Gracias Vix por ser quien eres y como eres!!!!!!
    Con mucho amor y apoyo,

    ReplyDelete
  31. great post Vix, really enjoyed reading it! It's how I'd interpret feminism too x

    ReplyDelete
  32. 'trouser suits weren't considered acceptable office wear as recently as the mid-1990's ' - I never knew that, seems a bit nuts how much things can change in a few years! When I started school (1990) none of the girls wore trousers but by the time I got to high school we all did. Love the blouse today, v pretty fabric :)

    ReplyDelete
  33. Vix--I had not realized you were a part of this group and was greatly excited to see your post among all the others at Mrs. Bossa. First, before I forget to say so, you are rocking those shorts! Second, you have raised an interesting question in my mind, about the possible ways that male identity might be compromised by their work lives. I know my own husband's dress was frequently dictated by the work he knew he might have to do in a given day. My father by contrast often wore suits at home on the weekends! Third, I cannot believe how you were treated by the police in your sexual assault...How can any individual be responsible for how another perceives them? The male point of view is carefully coded into the thinking of police, judges, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Vix such a great post. I also believe that one should dress for themselves, to feel good and confident. I also think if anyone feels the need to questions an outfit then they are perhaps jealous that they have lack of personal style. I love all of your outfits and you look amazing in hotpants!
    Dx

    ReplyDelete
  35. I feel the need to say "Amen Sister!!" hehe! Really fascinating post! xx

    ReplyDelete
  36. i suppose today you could get treated the same way by the police. human beings didn't got more brainy and empathetic during the past years. ok, i try to think positive ... 25% of human beings got more brain and empathy. sorry, i'm a little frustrated about men and mankind. ; )

    i stop singing the blues ... you look so fab in these shorts. adorable look.

    http://wardrobexperience.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  37. Vix your legs are endless and so slim.

    I too like my legs but your thighs are sooo tiny...please can I have them...pretty please!

    Lovely outfit by the way xx

    ReplyDelete
  38. Thats disgusting what the police said to you.

    I was attacked back in 2001 and I must admit the police were brilliant. I was wearing a shortish skirt but it was at 5pm at night on my way home from work. I must admit I think one of the officers was trying to flirt with me BUT I can honestly say they were brilliant.
    No woman deserves to be attacked no matter what she is wearing.
    My mother in law is very old fashioned and she thinks that if a woman wears a short skirt they deserve to be raped! An opinion that really annoys and angers me so much!

    xx

    ReplyDelete
  39. A brilliant perspective - agree 100%. Can't believe people thought your assistant was the boss just because he was male. I'd love more transparency on what people get paid for the same job as I suspect a lot of the time men are getting paid more for doing the same thing. xx

    ReplyDelete
  40. Brilliant post.I absolutely agree with you Vix.
    I once worked as a senior technician in a workshop and male visitors would look past me for my male superior! The Eighties was diabolical for sexism and it was often a fight to get taken seriously if you were in a skirt and wore make up. And don't get me started on men being paid more than women for the same work!!
    xxx

    ReplyDelete
  41. You look smoking hot you feminist biatch!
    I agree with you amor,you are a true inspiration to all women in Fashion and Feminism.
    I applaud thee bella.
    luv ya.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Absolutely gorgeous, I love your boots.
    xxx

    ReplyDelete
  43. A brave and intersting post Vix. At my school we still were not allowed to wear trousers to school when I left there in 1997...I jumped ship for the local college where you could wear whatever you wanted.

    ReplyDelete
  44. This is such a brave post - and I am appalled by the policeman's attitude. It reminds me of a recent story about a New York Times article about a gang rape: the article as good as suggested the eleven-year-old victim dressed provocatively and, thus, was "asking for it". GAH!

    I love your attitude and I agree that this is what feminism is about. Choosing exactly what you want to do and wear and how you want to present yourself. It's not about disdaining all things feminine.

    And you look lovely in that photograph!
    xxx

    ReplyDelete
  45. You're such an inspiration Vix! I think we're very lucky to live in this day in age. Freedom to do what we want. Ps you're such a fox!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Firstly, yes, yes, yes, I couldn't agree more with your stance on feminism. For me it's far more about being proud to be a woman and having confidence or looking to gain confidence.

    Secondly, sadly, I don't think attitudes have moved on that far. I volunteered at a rape crisis centre and the number of woman who didn't report incidents for fear of the way they'd be treated was staggering. In addition, the ridicilously low rape and similar conviction rate tell you there's still a way to go on that front. Sad.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Oh my god, I am actually raging at that policeman's comment! When will people realise that rape and related assaults are almost always about power, not sex? It doesn't matter what the hell you're wearing - a short skirt does not equal a come-on. Argh, so cross.

    I do class myself as a feminist and for the simple reason that I believe in the equality of the sexes and I think we've still got a fair way to go. The more militant element seems to have scared off quite a few people my age - some of them treat it as practically a dirty word now.

    Anyway, enough waffling by me. As one woman to another, I truly admire you. And you have bloody amazing legs!

    ReplyDelete
  48. Fantastic and inspiring post, Vix x
    Sadly even today there are a lot of people who still think a woman wearing a short skirt is asking to be attacked - doesn't say much for men, does it?
    I think I've got too much to say in a comment, so I'll do my own post later in the week (my mum is staying for a few days, so not much time for blogging)

    ReplyDelete
  49. I faffed it up last time I tried to comment so if you get a duplicate feel free to delete the extra!

    I was attacked in the street and blamed it on my short skirt. In fact when I look back my first thought is: if I had of been invisible it wouldn't have happened. Which quite accurately translates as 'if I didn't exist they couldn't get me'. It was around that point that I decided to be less than gorgeous. What a dishonor! I know loads of us have been attacked and our femaleness is the basic given reason.

    I love looking at your wonderful celebrations of who you are, the outfits you choose and your attitude, because you say in your ways that it's okay to celebrate being female and visible and gorgeous.

    I suppose my definition of a feminist today would include the words: unafraid, or to be more positive BRAVE! You are brave, not as in: ooh she's brave in that hat, but as in: brave style warrior! It's great you didn't let 'em get you down!

    ReplyDelete
  50. A few years ago i had a group of young lads try and get me to go in their car with them, they pulled up alongside me when i was walking to town in the afternoon, the one was very aggressive and i walked to the nearest house and they called the police, one of the first things they asked me was 'what was i wearing' it made me so angry xxx

    ReplyDelete
  51. This is such an amazing post - "We are only on this planet for a short while, we should grasp life with both hands and dress in celebration of the time we have." Wise words! I found so many uplifting things to take away from this post as well as some enragingly familiar ones!

    I go under the title of Dr. and I am always amazed at how many people expect to meet a man on first meeting me.

    I am sorry to hear of your assault and the frankly outrageous treatment at the hands of the police. An all too familiar tale even today I am afraid. But as you so rightly point out "until women can walk the streets dressed however they want without fear of molestation we will never be entirely equal". I totally agree!

    ReplyDelete
  52. That is awful what the police said! What idiots!
    Good on you for embracing your femininity whilst not compromising your feminist values <3
    xo

    ReplyDelete
  53. Well said, Vix.

    You look gorgeous, as always, and continue to inspire by your calm, succinct and insightful words. You are a fabulous feminist.

    So am I!

    Sarah xxx

    ReplyDelete
  54. I forgot to add that I was utterly astonished that in the UK wearing trousers to the office was not considered acceptable office wear for a woman. Really???

    And that you look amazing as always!

    ReplyDelete
  55. A brilliant post Vix. Possibly my favourite VV post ever and that's saying something.

    I have never seen the dichotomy between (my) femininity and feminism. As far as I am concerned one cannot be without the other.

    ReplyDelete
  56. What a great post!
    You look fantastic in the hot pants and blouse. That blouse looks like one I made at school in the late 60s. Does it button all the way down the back?

    ReplyDelete
  57. Interesting post, I'm going to email you.

    Shirl xxx

    ReplyDelete
  58. At the age of 17 (1975) when I announced I was pregnant my dad immediately sent me off to see "the boy", when I returned my dad immediately asked "will he marry you?" When I replied yes - but I don't want to get married, I was told "your lucky he has decided to marry you, you slept with him, you'll marry him". We were married, it didn't last. It was just how it was then, my genuinely wonderful father also held the opinion that a woman should be able (in theory of course!) to walk down a street naked without being raped or assaulted. I can also rememer the days when it was considered "wrong" for a woman to drink pints! - I had a (short lived) boyfriend who was horrified when I asked for a pint and instead bought me (under protest) two half pints which I still finished well before he finished his pint - I finally caused consternation by getting up and buying myself an actual pint - he was horrified that I could be so unfeminine :D - no wonder the relationship didn't last!!! xxx

    ReplyDelete
  59. Just when I think you can't get any more fabulous - you post a post like this one! You bloomin' rock lady!

    ReplyDelete
  60. What a brilliant and inspiring post this is!

    I'm so glad that I wasn't born way back when women were seen as lesser beings and treated as such. When women were punished and frowned upon and outcast for things people wouldn't bat an eyelid at nowadays like falling pregnant out of wedlock.

    I had a bad experience when I was 19. I was travelling on a coach from Bristol to Leeds. It was late at night so there wasn't many people left on the coach by that time. I was trying to sleep when I noticed an Indian man looking at me from a few seats in front of me.
    About 10 minutes later he approached me and sat down in the seat next to me sucking up all of my personal space. He started telling me about himself and showed me pictures on his phone of his country and his family and so on. The he started coming on to me, telling me how pretty I was and asking me if I would like to travel to his country if he paid for my ticket. I declined and told him I was already in a relationship and then he tried to kiss me and grope me right there on the coach! A young woman who was sitting at the back of the coach overhead the commotion and confronted the man in what I assumed was his home language. He apologised to me over and over and went back to his seat. She then told me that men in his country have power over the females and think they can do what they want.

    Things may have changed in more civilised countries but some women in other countries still have to endure inequality to this day which is very sad indeed.

    On a nicer note! Those hot pants are absolutely divine! You have such amazing stalks! xxx

    ReplyDelete
  61. Excellent post, and a brave one too... what a terrible experience for you. I'd like to think we've come a long way, but even today footballers and lowlifes get excused for their behaviour towards girls who are dressed "like they are asking for it"... what crap, we should be able to wear whatever we want (especially when we have such excellent taste and legs to show off like yours!) and not have to worry about it. We should also not have to put up with people telling us that we will want kids in the future... that's a personal pet hate of mine - just because I'm a woman doesn't mean that I want to get married and have kids!!!

    ReplyDelete
  62. This is a powerful post, Vix and a powerful image of a FEMINIST! Thank you for being wordy- you have shared so much- I got giggly and weepy in this little space of time and wowy- you are such a beauty, the kind that makes women feel good about themselves! I LOVE your outfit, what you wear and how you wear it, and I love how you don't limit yourself to the brandings of other. I am saddened to hear that there is sexual assualt in your past, but am so proud to hear you share the experience to empower us your readers. Thank you for proving that a feminist is powerful, smart, sassy and sexy. xo. -Bella Q
    the Citizen Rosebud

    ReplyDelete
  63. ze shorts are berry berry sexy! hotstuff!!!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Great boots, I love your words today.xx.

    ReplyDelete
  65. You look amazing dear! Loooove your outfit! <3

    ReplyDelete
  66. So sorry to hear about what happened to you, but life does through crap at you sometimes, so glad you came back stronger, YOU ARE A BEAUIFUL WOMAN and why the hell not flaunt it! You go girl!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Great post, Vix - couldn't agree more with everything you say xx

    ReplyDelete
  68. Hi Vix, wonderful post as always. Unbelievable what the police said to you, sadly I wouldn't trust it had completely changed. xx

    ReplyDelete
  69. I'm sad to hear what the policeman had to say. I hope they've improved.... You poor thing. Uncalled for. You look lovely in all the posts I've been catching up on. Your orange dress is to die for! Happy St. Patrick's Day Vix!! xxxxx

    ReplyDelete
  70. I wholeheartedly agree with your every word.

    ReplyDelete
  71. Vix, firstly "swit swoooo" to your legs! Fab! you totally rock shorts. Gorgeous lady.

    I can't believe you were even asked that by the police. It's amazing that even in this day and age now I've been told by friends that they have been warned about how to dress where the go to uni in fear of provoking attacks. Madness. And unfair.

    xxxx

    ReplyDelete
  72. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and being so open about your experiences. The nerve of those policemen! Victim-blaming, I'm afraid, is still a very strong mechanism in this society, and still primarily directed at women. So there is a lot left to fight for, even though like you I acknowledge how far we've come and I'm grateful for it.

    PS: I know this is just the kind of cliché we're up against, but I still can't help calling your wearing of hotpants brave, and admiring you for it. You look great in them, but I could never pull this kind of look off...

    ReplyDelete
  73. I am not really a feminist, but i am inclined to agree with your views. the discrimination has not been done away with. It has changed form. But I am hopeful that change will continue to find its way into our lives. You are an amazing, inspiring woman, and it's great to read your views and opinions. You rock that fashionable feminist outfit.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Vix - that is just the most brilliant post. You have captured why we are feminist so well. It is incredible we are still asserting ourselves and still fighting for even the smallest bit of equality. I'm not sure how things have improved in offices etc - that's why I don't work in one and the fashion industry can be a mix bag when it comes to respect and rights.

    Love the hot pants, love your look and love your post xxx

    ReplyDelete
  75. You are amazing! And you inspired me to get a little wordy myself. ;) It's strange to someone as young as me to think that the option of wearing pants is a choice that was once unavailable to women. I'm glad we had women like you to come before us.

    ReplyDelete
  76. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  77. Fantastic post Vix, you've hit the nail on the head as usual. I hate when people think because I love to wear dresses I must be "girly" (in the male negative sense of course) and are then suprised by my strong opinions on women's issues. Being true to yourself and proud of who you are is the best way to be a feminist xx

    ReplyDelete
  78. i love your look so much!!nice color combination and texture!!well done!i'm following...
    would you follow me back if you like my blog?i'd be happy..kiss:)

    patchworkporter.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  79. awesome post! you look gorgeous in the photos- i adore the shorts. and you bring up some great points about the ways equality still exists today, just beneath the surface of things. i'm so sorry you had to go through not only an assault, but then being blamed for it. it makes me angry just thinking about it.

    ReplyDelete
  80. You are a TRUE feminist in the best sense of the word, Vix! Celebreting being female...
    Unfortunately I think the idea that a woman 'provoked' and assault is still quite common. xxx

    ReplyDelete
  81. What a good post Vix! What the police said to you is utterly disgraceful but I daresay there are several people that still think that way. I love how you define feminism as freedom of choice! X

    ReplyDelete
  82. Vix you look amazing, what an inspiration you are.

    Much love feminist sister!

    Amie xxxx

    ReplyDelete
  83. Oh my dear Vix, I'm so sorry to hear that you suffered in the hands of not only an utter creep but the police who dared question your so-called involvement in such an attack. How humiliating that must have been for you. Thank you for sharing your thoughts on feminism in 2011 - we still have a long way to go don't we? xoxoxoxo

    ReplyDelete
  84. Fantastic. Thank you for paving the way for me, a woman. I'm in my forties and a feminist for...more than a couple of decades now. Thank you for fighting. AND for being fantastic, and not hiding it.

    I forgot my sense of style for more years than I care to recall and what you said about why people approached your assistant rather than you--about it having nothing to do with your appearance, but it being all about the fact that he was male, and you are female--I've recently come to recognize how true that is. And so why NOT dress and style myself the way that I want to? Whether you are trying to be or not, you are a source of inspiration.

    ReplyDelete
  85. That comment from the police officer makes me furious. It's sad to see that there is still a lot of discrimination towards women today. Even as an Ethnomusicology student, I am already beginning to encounter examples of unequal opportunity between male and female researchers.

    You are setting such a fine examply Vix! Go girl!

    xx Claire

    ReplyDelete
  86. I feel the same way, Vix. I love dressing girlie, I love being a female, but mostly I love having the freedom to choose. It's interesting what you said about your assistant being mistaken for the manager. I've been more and more aware lately of my behavior entering a place of business to direct my conversation to the individual who acknowledges me first, and not to the male first if it's a male and female situation. We've come a long way and still have a while to go.

    f
    The House in the Clouds

    ReplyDelete

Don't be shy, if you enjoyed your visit leave a comment, I can come and visit your blog if you do.
Love from Vix
xxx