Thursday, 30 April 2020

Our Lockdown Life - Day 40 & 41


Day 40 was another soggy one, albeit with intermittent showers rather than the incessant rain of Tuesday. I was so cold the previous evening that I'd opted for a long soak in the bath as opposed to my usual shower, the first time I'd had a bath this year. We'd watched another episode of Museums in Quarantine, this time a tour of the Young Rembrandt exhibition at Oxford's Ashmolean, closed due to the pandemic.


 After Wii Fit, breakfast & a quick blog catch-up, I got dressed, opting for an embroidered 1960s Indian cotton-gauze kaftan by Ayesha (found on eBay last year), some Afghan Kuchi earrings and my vintage tooled leather lion's head belt (from the 3 for a £1 basket a couple of years ago).


Jon braved the rain to fetch the compost from the greenhouse enabling me to repot the globe artichokes at the kitchen table.

 A couple of days ago I was sweeping the kitchen floor and discovered three new potatoes which must have fallen from the vegetable rack, rolled under the cupboard and sprouted so, as an experiment I potted them up to see what would happen. While I was at it I decided to repot our spider plants as well. Jon finished what he'd started on Gilbert yesterday, returned the compost to the greenhouse, reporting that both the beans & courgettes had shot up overnight.


After he'd emptied the bins (I can't believe it's been a fortnight since our collection), Jon suggested we go for a walk before our noodles so we had a brisk stroll around the block in the rain.


After lunch, I polished the pendant that had once been a button and looked up the silver mark online. It was made in 1902 by Arthur & John Zimmerman, silversmiths based in Regent Place, Birmingham and registered at the Birmingham assay office. Isn't she beautiful?


In the mood for a bit of restoration, Jon dug this out of the shed to attempt to strip off the varnish. It's the panel from a stagecoach door, bearing the coat of arms of General Thomas Grosvenor (1764 - 1851), who succeeded his father as Whig member of parliament for Chester. In 1820, following a snap general election triggered by the death of George III, an angry mob attacked Grosvenor's stagecoach, overturning it into the River Dee.


Mum's mum (my grandma Joan, who owned Stonecroft before we did) came from Chester where her great-grandfather retrieved the panel from the River Dee, shortly after the murder attempt, and it has remained in the family ever since. Years later, one of Grandma's sisters painstakingly researched Lord Grosvenor, attaching the information she'd unearthed to the back of the panel.


It isn't in the greatest condition but it's two hundred years old and spent time in a river, so it's hardly surprising really.


I dusted the bookshelves on the landing a few weeks ago but thought I'd attempt to tidy them up a bit - I didn't get far, I got distracted by a book. This isn't our only bookcase, there's a glazed Victorian behemoth in the dining room, a pile of paperbacks in each of our bedside tables and there's also my arts & fashion collection on top of my crafting cupboard further down the landing.


We're fairly disciplined when it comes to books, most of the paperbacks on our shelves are those we haven't yet read (or one of us has and thinks the other one would enjoy it.) Once they're read they normally donated back to the charity shop, at the moment they're piling up in the cupboard of doom.


I used to save any Indian themed novels to take when we travelled there, passing them on to fellow travellers once we'd read them. I regretted my actions far too often, wanting to re-read certain passages when we've actually been to the place they were set so that I now read them at home & I keep them. I don't know how many times I've read Shantaram, The God of Small Things & The White Tiger and if you've never read them then you really should.






The Woman at Home book at the far left of the shelf was published in 1912 and is a selection of articles taken from the magazine of the same name. We found it in the parental home when we moved there in 1970, in amongst the belongings of the lady who lived there before we did.


Even though it's been part of my life for fifty years it still holds me in thrall. The Edwardian Belle Epoque fashions are incredible and the articles fascinating, tips on holidaying in a horse-drawn gipsy caravan, interviews with the Russian royal family and Indian Ranis along with extracts from the diary of an Anglo-Indian housewife dealing with wayward servants - which I re-read this afternoon.



After a shower & pizza with salad, we retired to the lounge, opened the bar and watched Museums in Quarantine and The Great British Sewing Bee with our Wednesday night rum ration.

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After my Thursday Wii Fit session, we had breakfast and watched the truly inspiring Captain Tom's 100th Birthday celebrations on the BBC. I then caught up with Blogland and got dressed.


Day 41's lockdown outfit was a vintage crushed velvet embroidered maxi dress worn with some Vietnamese Hmong earrings and a pendant I bought in Goa a couple of years ago.


I swept the carpet in the middle room, pulled out the desk and scrubbed the radiator behind it. I can't remember ever cleaning it before, it certainly didn't look like I ever had! Tut, tut! On a bit of a cleaning roll, I swept and mopped the hall floor whilst I was at it.


When I had a bath on Tuesday night I looked across at the wall opposite and wasn't keen on how plain it looked. I can't be doing with clean lines and uncluttered spaces, they depress me.


 After a couple of drinks last night, inspiration struck, I remembered a Victorian picture frame we'd rescued from the parental home and a vintage Italianate gilt shelf I had stashed away in a drawer.


Combined with one of the spider plants I'd repotted yesterday, Jon made my idea a reality.


After a break for noodles, swathed in the 1920s silk kimono I'd wrapped myself in earlier as an alternative to switching the central heating on, armed with my vintage brolly I went for a wander around the garden.





After a dry & sporadically sunny start, today had descended into yet another damp and dreary day. I know us Brits are mildly obsessed with the weather at the best of times but, with nowhere to go other than a quick walk around the block, a rainy day doesn't half impede one's activities.


Still, as my elderly relatives always used to say, all this rain is good for the gardens.


The skies may be grey but the shrubs, tubs and borders are blooming.



The plants in the greenhouse are coming along nicely, as well. Check out Jon's French beans (and his snazzy jumper).


A lot of my blogging friends refer to our tortoise Jacob as a turtle*, if the rain continues he'll be in danger of becoming one!

*Tortoises and turtles are both reptiles but from different classification families. Tortoises are entirely land-dwelling whereas turtles live in water. 



We've just got back from a walk around the block, timing it just right as the rain has started again. After a mug of tea to warm up, Jon'll crack on with making a paneer curry for tea.

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Tonight - after clapping for our carers - we'll be watching the new BBC series of The Real Marigold Hotel where a group of well-known pensioners (including the fabulous Zandra Rhodes) check out retirement options in other parts of the world. They're in the former French colony of Pondicherry in Southern India, a place Jon & I liked so much that we visited twice (in 2006 and 2010). If you want to see it through the eyes of normal people, as opposed to wealthy celebs, check out my post HERE.


Stay safe, stay positive and tell me what you've been up to.

79 comments:

  1. I fear I've reached a certain age where I find myself commenting that the rain will do the gardens good. When did that happen? :)

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    1. It's scary when we start to turn into our grandmas!!

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  2. Spotted Zandra Rhodes right off the bat. Don't know any of the others. My sister found a jigsaw puzzle in a free library and sent it to me. Thanks, we always do them when I visit. It's on the dinning room table. Yes, rain is good for the gardens...and the weeds and thorny vines.

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    1. They're British celebs with the exception of Britt Ekland (she's had a lot of work done by the look of her, lovely dress though!)
      You've reminded me, I have a jigsaw stashed away under the bed, I might crack it out if the rain continues. Don't mention the brambles!

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  3. We were so excited by the return of the Sewing Bee, and we're thoroughly enjoying it, even though the furthest either of us have ever ventured into the realm of dressmaking is sewing on a loose button! We also watched the Tate Britain episode of Museums in Quarantine last night - after I read about the series in your last blog post - and I'm especially looking forward to Rembrandt at the Ashmolean, as we were due to see it in the flesh at Easter, but obviously couldn't go. I'm glad to see your veg is thriving, and that not even the weather is dampening your spirits! I've got to admit, I have enjoyed today's downpours, and found them rather refreshing.

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    1. Hello Fran! Great to hear from you. It's such a lovely show, isn't it? It can't fail to put a smile on anyone's face. Joe Lycett cracks me up.
      What a shame that you never got to see Young Rembrandt, I'm glad you'll be able enjoy it on the Beeb. It's a great series, I hope they do a few more. Have you seen any of The Art Lover's Guide? That's another must-see series, combinng travel with art and architecture.
      I love lying in bed and listening to the rain. xxx

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    2. Nope, we haven't seen The Art Lover's Guide, but I shall try to track it down. I trust your judgement on quality television, as we seem to have similar tastes (we also like our Nordic Noir). :)

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  4. Thank you, I'm really enjoying your blogs and amazing clothes. I'm enjoying being at home and hand quilting a patchwork Kimono I'm making.X

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    1. Thanks so much, Bev! I absolutely love the sound of your hand-quilted kimono, what a fantastic project. x

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  5. More scrubbing! Your house looks wonderful and the new frame and shelf look great in your bathroom. I only have a small bookshelf, then tubs of books that need to go back to the thrift. It seems highly unlikely that those will reopen this year so I will just have to exchange them at the small free libraries around our neighborhood :)

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    1. Thank you! A few friends are leaving boxes of books outside their houses with signs telling passers-by to help themselves, I think I might be following suit soon - I'll wait till the rain stops! xxx

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  6. Those glass blocks are fab. Tony and I had considered using them when we had the ensuite built. Sadly it wasn't practical but we both still drool whenever we see them. I bet that velvet dress was lovely and warm and very necessary. I'm loving your blog posts Vix. It makes my day to see that you have posted. x

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    1. Hello Cherie! I've always loved glass blocks, when Jon built the bathroom by dividing the landing and adding a partition wall it was the perfect excuse to use some.
      From off-the-shoulder to floor length velvet in a matter of days, British weather is anything but dull!
      So glad you like the profusion of posts. xxx

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  7. We've had some rainy days as well, no all-dayers but quite a few heavy downpours. I guess it's good for the garden. I didn't even mind walking to the grocery shop in a drizzle, without an umbrella, something I usually hate. Wednesday's kaftan is gorgeous! I think it will work with the sprouting potatoes, and you can perfectly grow them in a pot too. That stagecoach door panel is fascinating! I always get distracted when tidying the bookshelves. In fact, I started rearranging some of our shelves in December and then abandoned the project. The Woman at Home book would keep me occupied for days. And how fabulous is today's crushed velvet maxi! I loved joining you on your stroll through the garden. How lush it all looks. xxx

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    1. Showers are acceptable, aren't they? It's the all-dayers that sap your enthusiasm and make everything a bit of an effort.
      Books are such a distraction, I'd also forgotten to mention that we've got a bookshelf of cookery and gardening books in the kitchen, every area has it's own theme! xxx

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  8. Your garden is lovely! The rain has certainly perked things up outside, but inside I confess it just makes it dark and saps my motivation a bit. I obviously should be like you and have a fabulous bright kimono to waft about in (I'm still wearing a black velvet dressing gown, maybe it's affecting my mood!)

    I have seen episode 1 of sewing bee, does help a bit with prompting some make do and mend. I am actually making something for the baby!!

    Thank you for doing this diary, it's something to look forward to reading xx

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    1. Thank you! The rain does make everything look lush and healthy but these dark days don't suit me at all. Today started off lovely but yet again it's clouded over and the sky looks rather ominous - gah!
      The good thing about that ancient kimono is how warm it is, I'm reluctant to put the heating back on.
      Next week's Sewing Bee is a children's special, isn't it? How lovely that you're making something for Otis, I bet it'll be fiddly to sew something so tiny but at least you won't need much fabric! xxx

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  9. Hi there, how's it going? Love the first photo, you remind me of a Geisha, very exotic!! BTW, I loved reading "Memoirs of a Geisha" by Arthur Golden, highly recommendable if you haven't already read it. The garden is looking spectacular, such a wide variety of plants, shrubs, herbs.. lovely. Love the belt buckle and the pendant. I like silver jewellery but such a pain having to clean it all! Incredible story about retrieving the panel from the River Dee!! You made me smile when you said "uncluttered spaces depress me", I feel exactly the same although I'm soon going to have to have a serious declutter before it completely takes over! Saw the film "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" so think I will love this series , will check it out. After languishing at home for the last 2 months, I'll finally be back to work (albeit online) on May 11th so of course, panic stations with my boss,and now everything has to be done in a hurry, isn't it just typical! But have to say I'm really relieved, as I'm self-employed so no income for the last two months, so good news. Have to tell you a friend has passed on a copy of "Shantaram". Think you said it was one of your favourite books so looking forward to reading it (although I'm not going to have time now til the summer holidays!) Take care and have a fabulous weekend!! xx

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    1. Hello, Diana! We've been watching the news and are very happy to hear that Spain are gradually coming out of lockdown. You're allowed out next week, aren't you? Will you be glad to be back at work (online!)?
      Silver cleaning is dead easy. Line a deep sided casserole dish with foil, add a couple of teaspoons of baking powder, add your jewellery, fill with boiling water and leave for half-an-hour. Polish with a dry cloth - easy!
      Thee's decluttering and there's minimalism, sorting out is good, living with plain walls and a single vase on a self, that's just miserable!
      You'll love the Best Marigold Series, it's been going for a few years. They mostly go to india but there's also been episodes in many different countries including Japan, Mexico, Cuba and America. You'll be glad to know that Zandra Rhodes is every bit as lovely as I hoped she'd be.
      Shantaram is a great read, one of those page-turning epics you're sad to finish. I always pictured protagonist, Lin, to be Russell Crowe. Let me know what you think.
      Much love to you! xxx

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  10. Have read "The God of Small Things", beautiful! Have "The White Tiger" but haven't read it yet. Remember reading "A Passage to India" for A-levels. Also read "The Jewel in the Crown" (The Raj Quartet - Book 1) some years ago, didn't think I was going to enjoy it but did. Would also recommend "Heat and Dust" by Ruth Prawer Jhabval!!

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    1. Loved Memoirs of a Geisha, I might read that again, it's been years. I've read Passage to India and The Jewel in the Crown after watching them and much prefered the books. I've seen Merchant Ivory's Heat & Dust but haven't read the book so thanks for that! xxx

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    2. Yes, we can go outside for a walk this weekend, can't wait!! Thanks for the silver cleaning tip, sounds a lot easier than my way!!

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    3. Beats using that horrible smelling chemical stuff! Enjoy your freedom. xxx

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  11. in german its just "schildkröten" - with water/sea- (wasser/meeres-) or land- (land-)(ha!) attached..... a little of the rain has reached us. waiting for more.....
    love the kimono ensemble - very 1910 - especially in the romatic garden scenery. such fantastic jewelry!
    xxxxx

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    1. That's a lot easier, you can't get the land or sea mixed up that way!
      I thought I'd sent our rain over to you this morning but it appears to want to hang around a bit longer.
      I've had a bit of a thing for Edwardian history this week so your comment about my 1910 outfit makes me very happy indeed! xxx

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  12. Oh to look so gorgeous each day, Vix, it is a delight to see whatever you're wearing and the history of whatever is in your life. So interesting. And the garden is flourishing so well, congrats for all the hard work you've both done. Loved the Pondicherry post, I've always wanted to ensconce myself there at a smaller ashram than the Shri Aurobindo one (Ananda Ashram), but life decided otherwise.......

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    1. Thank you, that's so kind of you, Ratnamurti!
      Pondicherry was a wonderful place, I was so excited to visit Auroville. Did you know that visitors have to watch an information film before they're allowed to enter the ashram? It was the weirdest thing ever, like a 1960s edition of Star Trek! xxx

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  13. Very interesting post. Your blog has very cool content <3

    https://milentry-blog.blogspot.com

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  14. I'm watching the Real Marigold as I write, I love india. I've read the The God of Small Things & The White Tiger, and want to read Shantaram. Have you read A Fine Balance - heart wrenching and magnificent, and Such a Long Journey. Your home and garden look lovely. I like the frame and shelf.

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    1. Hello Polly! Loveky to meet a fellow Indiaphile. I loved Fine Balance, it's actually sitting on my bookshelf waiting to be revisited as it's been years since I read it. I'm not familiar with Such a Long Journey so I shall hunt it down, thanks so much for recommending it and your lovely comment. xxx

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  16. Dear lady, you really know how to amuse us with your delightful kaftans and photos of decorative details in your home!, such a lovely post!
    Love your embroidered kaftan and love your velvet dress with the fab pendant!, both are so gorgeous ensembles!. And you look so Fabulous wearing your red kimono for a walk in the garden!
    It's pretty interesting to have a look at other people's shelves!. Both Mr.A. and I had a massive amount of books when we moved together, but, after moving number three, we've purged our bookshelves and haven't bought more books since then. The public library provides us with lots of interesting reads!, we're missing it!
    Love to see your plants growing so nicely!
    besos

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    1. Thanks, Monica! I thought I'd photo my clothes hanging up rather than on me, so everyone could appreciate the finer details.
      Books take over our lives far too easily, you're very wise just using the library! xxx

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  17. It must be wonderful to live in a home where your Grandma lived previously.Did your Mum live there too or was it before she was born?Mine didn't but she did live further down the road and I was born only a bit further away it the opposite direction which makes me feel I belong here.Seeing your lovely garden I have started to research more trees online today but I think I need evergreens as my garden isn't very big and so I can't get too many x

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    1. Hello, Flis! My grandparents bought the house in 1953, when Mum was 11 so yes, she lived there until she married my Dad in 1966 and they bought a house round the corner. They bought the house opposite, The Cottage, the one I call my parental home, in 1970. It really is lovely to be so connected to your past, isn't it?
      Have you thought about silver birches? Many years ago our council was trying to make the more urban areas greener and offered all the residents free Silver Birch saplings, they shot up in no time and look beautiful in leaf or bare! xxx

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    2. Yes I love silver birch trees and I did receive a free one with coupons but I tried to grow it in a pot.I was sent a Rowan too which survived.I shall get another Silver Birch and thanks for reminding me x

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    3. Ecalyptus trees are gorgeous, too - they grow really quickly! xxx

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  18. You bring a smile to my face whenever your new post comes along. Love hearing how much both you and Jon are getting done around your home/garden and especially seeing all your delightful bits and bobs.

    My eyes went immediately to your book collection. I'm always intrigued by other people's selections. You have a few there that look interesting.

    How fascinating that a few generations of your family have lived in your home.

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    1. Awww, thanks so much Suzy, you comment means a lot to me.
      I love looking at other people's bookshelves, too, an endless source of fascination! xxx

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  19. What a gorgeous kaftan - and I am dying over that belt buckle! I love your vintage parasol/umbrella and your Chinese robe over your luscious velvet dress. Vix, you just bring a smile to my face. Jon's jumper is smashing - what a bold stripe!

    I loved poking in your books, thank you! That medallion is so amazing, as is that vintage panel that you've rescued. Your bathroom plant frame is genius!

    Thanks so much for the lovely post, Vix!

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    1. I just about died when I found that belt, isn't he a magnificent creature?
      The umbrella is really unusual, it must be modelled on a parasol with that dome shaped top but it's far more useful being waterproof! xxx

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  20. Isn't Capt Tom amazing. Such cool guy. I like to thank him for his service and the time he putting in for COVID 19.
    I wish we would get the great sewing bee, the few I saw I was hooked

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    1. Captain Tom really is an inspiration, such a humble man and raising £32 million, unbelievable! xxx

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  21. We could use some of your rain, if you're through with it!
    Good luck with the spuds. In my experience, they will grow in just about any soil, and even in a bag filled with dirt. If you ever get larger ones with eyes sprouted all over you can cut the potatoes first into pieces and then start several plants. I'll be interested to see what you get.

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    1. Have it with my pleasure! Sadly it seems to want to stick around.
      Thanks for the potato info, I keep finding conflicting advice when I looked online about growth inhibitors and blight and in the end thought, sod it, what's the worst that can happen?! xxx

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  22. I have high hopes for your potatoes. Have you posted the noodle recipe/type? I get a craving to make spicy noodles whenever you write about them.

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    1. It's got to be worth a try planting those potatoes, hasn't it? One of my friends has wedged an onion in a water-filled tumbler on the windowsill and it's grown huge roots. Something fun to try?
      The noodles are by Koh-Lee and are pre-spiced and shop bought, not handmade. xxx

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  23. I adore that velvet dress. Just heavenly. Hasn't it been cold again? I stupidly got all my sundresses out and hung them in my wardrobe. I should have followed your example and kept them in a case. Oh well, hopefully the good weather will be back before too long.
    I always grow potatoes from a couple of odd ones from a supermarket bag, chitted on the windowsill. I know the books say you need the special garden ones, but ours always grow, so I'm sure yours will be successful.
    Talking of gardening books, it would be really fun to see yours, and your cookbooks.
    Take care xx

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    1. Thanks, Annie! I do love a bit of velvet. I've been gardening with bare legs and ankle boots this morning, I'm going to have to relent and put my tights and knee highs on for my afternoon walk, it's really chilly out of the sun.
      Thanks for the potato reassurance, I kept reading what a bad idea growing shop-bought potatoes are.
      I'll photograph the cookery & gardening books soon! xxx

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  24. I share a fair few of your books. Jo Nesbo is my favourite Scandi Noir author, I cant resist a Harry Hole!
    Your red tartan and vintage umbrella is absolutely beautiful, I loved it o Instagram but now I've seen the dress that you were wearing underneath I love it even more.
    Finally we have a bit of sun here this morning, it isnt forecast to last but it's good to see it again. The gardens are loving the rain but it will be good to get outside again.
    Your bathroom decoration is inspired, love it.
    Take care xxx

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    1. My copy of The Snowman is dedicated to me and signed by Jo Nesbo, a blog reader knew I loved him, saw that he was doing a signing in London and got me a copy. How lovely was that?
      I have a real weakness for vintage brollies. I always used to find them at car boot sales on the stalls that did house clearances. No chance of that happening this year.
      I managed to get my planting done before the rain started. It's dry again now but I'm going to have to look out my tights and boots for a walk later, that wind is cold! xxx

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  25. Never mind the virtual museum tours, I'm enjoying the opportunity to browse your bookshelves and bibelots! The coach panel is an amazing treasure! (What else is buried in that shed, one wonders?) * The frame with shelf and plant construction is a handsome example of why NOT to discard household flotsam and jetsam if there's room for it. And the view of you at the pond in your scarlet kimono with parasol is surreal in its loveliness. I know "ruthlessly practical" women who would have filled in that pond rather than care for it -- and binned the kimono and parasol "to save space." Bah! to Minimalism!

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    1. Brilliant! So glad you're enjoying seeing our endless mountains of stuff! It's so rewarding to finally come up with a use from things I've had for ever, totally justifying my excuse to keep it saying "it'll come in useful one day!"
      Minimalism is a swear word in this house! xxx

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  26. This new series of Marigold was so much better, possibly the location but also the travellers are such a nice bunch this time. I love it and can't wait for the next episode - I could definitely retire in India! I love Zhandra Rhodes (never knew she was a Londoner until I heard her accent). I forgot all about my Vietnamese earrings - do you remember, you pointed me to them on eBay and I got a pair as I didn't think to look for any when we were in Vietnam. I love your Kimono - I would wear that all the time indoors it's beautiful.

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    1. Aren't they a lovely bunch? I really enjoyed seeing Britt Eckland & Henry Blofelt going for a coffee in The Indian Coffee House (we always used to go in there, too!) and how Britt said that she didn't ned a man to validate her existence, she was her own trophy!
      I do remember that you bought earrings from the same seller - I think we need to see them on your blog. He had some amazing stuff, didn't he?
      I always feel so glam in that kimono, the silk has totally shattered but I love it! xxx

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  27. Such gorgeous outfits! The red kimono outfit plus umbrella was really painterly; I could imagine you painted on a plate similar to a Willow pattern but one in red!

    I loved seeing your books; I love looking at other's book collections. I've been off loading my read ones by leaving them in a box on the front garden wall asking people to take them - and they do!

    The gilt plant stand in the frame is lovely - what a good idea.

    The blooms are beautiful and I hope your potatoes grow. When OH was repotting a plant to another pot in this lockdown period; he found three, admittedly very small, potatoes I had stuck in the soil last year...if we had left them I wonder how big they might have grown?

    I'm thoroughly enjoying The Marigold Hotel. Zandra Rhodes outfits and jewellery are fab. I saw her once many years ago when I was getting off the bus with my kids at Marylebone coach station. Just as vivid and gorgeous as she is now 30 odd years later.

    Let's pray for more sunshine...
    xxxx








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    1. I had high hopes for the weather today but I'm inside reading blogs as it's failed to live up to expectations.
      Once we have a few dry days I'm going to do the same with my books, the cupboard under the stairs is starting to fill up.
      Fancy finding those potatoes!
      Loved the Real Marigold, Zandra was just lovely, incredibly glamorous and buckets of style. I bet she stood out a mile at the bus station! xxx

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  28. Think you might like this: https://folkforestwitch.tumblr.com

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  29. I have come to realize that your house is more interesting in a single day, than mine is during an entire year!

    I am also envious that so much of your garden is already in bloom. Then again, I am making up fake planters...

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    1. Never, your house is fab! I like your fake planters, they look a million times better than our neighbour's! x

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  30. Isn't it exciting when seeds sprout overnight? I love going into the greenhouse to see what's changed.
    The Real Marigold Hotel will be something else I watch on iPlayer, along with Sewing Bee.
    xx

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    1. It is! I lovce seeing Jon striding up the garden with a big grin on his face, anxious to tell me about the latest discovery! xxx

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  31. Hello, that first pic is stunning! Another peak inside your home - fab. You have been busy again. Curious like someone else said do you both plan your day or just do what you feel like I started setting goals but after a while just do what I feel like as long as I keep doing something!I agree your house is so interesting well done and stay safex

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    1. Thanks so much! Yes, I go with the flow - sunshine & warmeth and I'll find something to do outside (and run around the house looking for stuff to wash) and cold and rain means indoor pursuits, a rigid timetable isn't much fun, is it? Look after yourself. xxx

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  32. You could be on the cover of 'The Distant Land of Our Fathers'! which is on my bookshelf too. Such a beautiful geisha you do make. I haven't watched previous 'The Real Marigold Hotel' episodes but though I'd give this new series a try. I always felt so sorry for Britt after she was unceremoniously dumped by Rod when she no longer became useful to him in America but she's a bit of a flirt with the men which is rather double-standard'ish of her, assuming her philosophy about the opposite sex is true. I think Barbara Dixon will take no prisoners!!Good job on your garden all round. I can almost predict the arrival of a 'bricks and mortar'greenhouse for next year's crops!Have a good weekend, both.xx

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    1. Thank so much! The Real Marigold is such an enjoyable programme, especially when they visit India. I like Britt's Scandinavian-style directness, Barbara seems a lovely lady (dresses well, too!) but Zandra is my favourite, she's just fabulous.
      I'd love a proper greenhouse, like one of those huge Victorian glasshouses you see at national trust properties (in my dreams!) xxx

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  33. 'The Distant Land of My Father'!!!(been praying too hard this week!)

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  34. That 1920's Silk Kimono is DIVINE!

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  35. That red styling is so beautiful. The red kimono paired with a red dress is a stunning combo. You look great in red! It is lovely to see your collections of books. I love books but I try not to be become a hoarder so most of my copies are classical books that I know I will reread and use.

    I honestly didn't think about turtle and tortoise in that way. I always said to kids that turtle is a word more commonly used in American English as opposed to tortoise in British English, but I forgot to mention the distinction between the land and water dwelling types. I need to remember that. I think I knew that that one would always say sea turtles and that it wouldn't be possible to say sea tortoise but I never really thought about it in detail. I think that in American English, they use turtle for both land and water dwelling types, at least in causal conversation (experts probably use more than one term or have more terms to difference between them).

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    1. Thanks, Ivana! The kimono complimenting my dress was a happy accident, anything to stop being cold!
      We don't like having cluttered bookshelves, once they're read then they're mostly moved on. I've put a ple outside the house this morning with a a sign saying "Free books!", ine has already gone. xxx

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  36. Oh my gosh, I must be a grandma, I ALWAYS say 'this rain will be good for the garden'!
    I love your silk robe and crushed velvet dress - it's gorgeous.

    Thanks for sharing your book shelves with us, I'm always intrigued by people's book collections. I borrowed Debbie Harry's book 'Face It' before corona virus and have still got it at home as our library is letting people keep the books during this quarantine period. I'm in the middle of reading another book at the moment but am keen to get to it. Is it any good? X

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    1. Thanks, Jess! We're all turning into grandmas!!
      I haven't read Face It yet, I tend to read biographies during the day rather than at night in bed so I'm waiting for a warm, sunny day so I can sit outide with it. xxx

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  37. Ooh, hel-LO Lady in Read! Looking good!
    Yesssssssssssss, I love seeing your book shelves!!! So cool!
    Alas, despite having done a lot of cleaning and sorting, my house STILL remains a tip! I just cannot sustain tidiness. A shame really...
    x

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    1. Thanks, Kezzie!
      I always say it's more a lack of adequate storage than anyone's fault for being untidy. xxx

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  38. You are so productive! I love the story of that carriage panel.

    I see you have a lilac tree - that must smell absolutely heavenly right now.

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Thank you for leaving a comment. If you have a blog I'll pop over and return the favour.

Lots of love, Vix