Monday, 20 May 2019

Doing The Recycling - My Latest Secondhand Finds

Here's a round-up of the latest editions to my wardrobe and, as everything is secondhand, it's the most exciting form of recycling. To accommodate my finds I had a bit of a bedroom tidy up and did some sums. I'm not sure of the total amount of items of clothing I own but just six were bought new from high street retailers. Everything else was either purchased from Indian fair trade companies, handmade by me using vintage fabric or bought secondhand. After further investigation, out of a grand total of 30 items of footwear, 50% were pre-owned and just two of my bags were bought new. All my underskirts are secondhand as are half of my socks, most of my tights and three out of my six bras. I buy the best quality knickers I can afford (M&S or La Redoute) wash them at 30°C & line dry them which means they last for ages. I've got 22 pairs of pants, the newest being two years old and the oldest I've had for over a decade.


I love shopping, which is why I chose to make a career out of it. I adore trawling eBay for hidden gems and the thrill of anticipation at getting up at the crack of dawn to trudge around car boot fields; the buzz  from rifling through rails of tat to unearth pure gold in charity shops & discovering beautiful artisan-made textiles on my travels in India. My expectations are never high yet I'm rarely disappointed. Every garment in my wardrobe tells a story, the rush of adrenaline when I spot something beautiful on a charity shop rail or crumpled up in the bottom of a suitcase at a car boot sale, an item listed in an incorrect category on eBay which I watch anxiously for a week hoping against hope than nobody else spots it, a one-of-a-kind, perfectly fitting artisan produced dress found in a shop I'd only popped into to escape the punishing heat of the Indian tropics. 

WEARING: Vintage Chinese embroidered jacket (car boot sale) worn with 1960s Dollyrockers silk maxi (eBay, 2011), original 1960s green suede go-go boots (a gift from Vonda, a blog reader)

I hate it when I overhear someone being complimented on an outfit and to hear the response "This? It was only from ______" (fill the blank with a high street shop of choice). I don't want anything in my wardrobe to be only from somewhere, like an apology. My clothes may be recycled, they've had at least one previous owner but I'm proud of everything in my wardrobe. They'll never be an only, they all have a history & a tale to tell.


Take this jacket. We'd been stock-hunting at the car boot sale for ages on Sunday before we saw anything remotely interesting. Just as I was starting to get despondent I caught sight of this vintage Chinese jacket out of the corner of my eye. I couldn't hand my £1 over fast enough. Not only does it match my silk Dollyrockers maxi perfectly but also compliments Ebbie, our 1970 VW 411 LE Variant Type 4.


Despite the numerous campaigns highlighting the damage fast fashion is doing to our planet (HERE) it doesn't appear to have made much of an impression judging by the mountains of cheap high street tat in the Staffordshire fields yesterday morning. In fact I think the problem is getting worse. Most of the traders we saw peddling their unwanted gear had so much of the stuff that they'd simply dragged their overflowing black sacks out onto the grass and left the public to sort it out. Even at four items for £1 nobody seemed interested meaning that it will inevitably be dumped at a charity shop and then, as the chazzas are already drowning in discarded fast fashion, it will probably get sent to Africa where our cast-off clothing has contributed to the collapse of the traditional textile industries (see HERE) or, if the sellers can't be arsed to drive to their nearest shop, it'll be dumped in landfill where those plastic-based synthetic garments will still be rotting down when we're long dead (see HERE).

If you don't think our buying decisions have an effect on the fashion industory then read this excellent article Stop buying crap, and the companies will stop making crap. Make no mistake, we, as consumers, DO have the power to eradicate the brands that are destroying the planet and exploiting their workers.

WEARING: Vintage bastard massive sleeved maxi dress, bought from a charity shop last week.

I read countless excuses given by bloggers for buying cheap new fashion as opposed to shopping secondhand first I haven't got the time, there's nothing available in my area,what's the harm of buying a few things when everyone else is doing it?....I could argue till I'm blue in the face instead I choose to unfollow any blogs promoting fast fashion or sponsored IG pages - it may sound harsh but liking or commenting just serves to encourage the rampant consumerism. If they unfollow me and I get fewer visitors then so be it, we clearly didn't have anything in common in the first place.


If there's no decent secondhand shops in your area go further afield. If you're in the UK have a look at the Find a Charity Shop section on the Association of British Charity Shops website and go on a road trip. As you know, we visited a popular tourist town an hour away last week and still managed to find some beautiful and reasonably priced clothes (including the dress I'm wearing above) despite the hoards of visitors. If you're short on time eBay is open 24 hours a day and, trust me, there's some incredible bargains out there if you look properly. Facebook is also brilliant for bargains and if you join your local selling group you'll be able to pick your purchases and save on postage costs.


Talking of eBay, here's a new-to-me Dollyrockers frock to add to my collection. British designer, Samuel Sherman's Dollyrockers label (1965 - 1975) was a range of hip & happening clothes showcased by George Harrison's then girlfriend Patti Boyd and a major part of Swinging London's Youthquake movement of the 1960s. Some vintage traders (not me!) charge between £100 - £200 for their dresses. This one was £20. Why so cheap? The auction finished on Sunday lunchtime when it appears most Brits are stuffing their faces and not hunting for vintage frocks. Stodgy roast dinners or psychedelia? I know which I prefer. 

WEARING: Vintage Dollyrockers dress worn with go-go boots (as before) and a vintage Indian rupee coin necklace I made myself

I was thrilled when it turned up. I've got a yellow one in the same style but it's slightly too big (so off it goes to the stockroom.) This one is the perfect fit and was made to be worn with my 1960s lime green suede go-go boots.



WEARING: Vintage Jody T of California maxi dress with Lotta from Stockholm clogs, 1960s Alfred Tricker Crafts stainless steel and snakeskin choker (car boot sale, 2010)


You may remember this dress from a previous post. I found it on eBay last Autumn with a Buy-It-Now price of £8 and didn't have to think twice before clicking the Buy Now button. How I love a Buy-It-Now! There's an ILGWU label inside but no maker's name but a friend on Instagram tells me that she has the same dress in her collection and it's by Jody T of California. I found the 1970s Dolcis bag in the charity clearance shop last week for £3. I nearly put it in the stockroom, in fact I did - for about an hour. What was I thinking? It's perfect with my apple green clogs.


I love clogs. My heart belongs to Lotta from Stockholm (a Swedish family business producing handmade clogs for over 100 years, using sustainable wood) and I'm more than happy to buy them at full price but if I find other brands of clogs going cheap in a charity shop I'll always give them a go. Last year I bought some Swedish Hasbeens for £1.99 but they rubbed my feet to ribbons so last week I donated them back to the shop. Just as I was leaving I spotted these TopShop black nubuck clogs priced at just £2. Sold!


As I share a surname with the inventor of Sheffield Stainless Steel, Harry Brearley (1871 -1948), I've a bit of an affinity for the stuff especially the groovy modernist jewellery of the late 60s and early 70s. Emma, an IG friend picked up this collection from a car boot sale but didn't notice until she got home that most of the stones were missing from the choker. I offered to give it a home and substituted the abalone with some turquoise beads from my stash. 


Of course, the main reason I spend all my time shopping is to keep Kinky Melon's Retro Boutique stocked up. Once the festival season kicks off we'll be on the road for two months so won't have any time to go stock hunting. Here's this weekend's additions:

US Marine issue woodland camo smock; 1970s Winfield (Woolworths) western shirt; 1980s fringed suede jacket; 1970s dagger collared shirt by STUD; Bolivian waistcoat; 1970s Charles Anthony dagger collar shirt

Vintage Chinese silk brocade quilted dress; Chinese quilted jacket; 1960s Italian embroidered wool cardigan; 1970s suede mini skirt; 1960s Crimplene mini; 1960s knit mini; 1960s turquoise suede dress; 1980s brocade bustier; 1970s suede midi skirt

1970s suede mini skirt; Chinese embroidered satin wrap; 1960s deadstock Crimplene mini dress; 1980s hippy tunic; 1960s St Michael Young Miss cotton mini dress; Vintage silk cheong-san; 1960s Claude Amos mini; 1960s suede mini skirt; 1960s suede mini skirt.
Needless to say, the Kinky shed is bursting at the seams!


Right, I'm off to Wetherspoons in my new old dress shortly, putting a whole new spin on the saying, taking the recycling out.

See you soon!

75 comments:

  1. Those sleeves are indeed pretty epic! I have that very same Dolcis bag, but didn't know it was Dolcis or even what era it was. It needs the zip fixing so I haven't used it yet. I honestly think that car boot shopping is much better for us physically and mentally than shopping the high street. It's far more ethical, you get lots of fresh air doing laps of a field, and I think it forces us to be more creative, as we're not presented with styling suggestions or colour palettes. I try and be super strict with myself these days and if I buy new, I have to justify the hell out of it! xx

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    1. Fancy us both having the same bag! Shows that good quality lasts.
      I agree about car boot sales, it's lovely to get out into the countryside and yes, looking at all that unwanted stuff does make you think outside the box, wondering how you can utilise something that catches your eye. xxx

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  2. wow, I enjoy so much this kind of posts!, I think that more and more people are becoming interested in knowing where our clothes come from and where they go when we discard them. And second hand/vintage are both becoming fashionable even in my neck of the woods, which is amazing!. There are some positive news!
    I do love your chinese jacket and how fab it looks with your dress. And also love your massive sleeves dress, what a fantastic piece!, and the Dollyrockers dress totally rocks!, you're particularly gorgeous in it!!
    Thanks for sharing your adventures on bargains hunting!
    besos
    (as a note, I'll be in London for a week in June!, I'll look for any ocassion to go wherever you are trading!

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    1. I'm so excited that secondhand is catching on in your part of the world! There really does seem to be a big movement towards shopping in a more sustainable fashion, maybe people really are getting sick of over consumption and the impact the constant buying of new is making on our planet.
      I cannot wait to meet you! xxx

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  3. I absolutely adore that Jody T dress!!!! In my hometown sometimes the charity shops are busier than any of the others!

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    1. Thanks, Liz! Wish Walsall was the same, everyone I walk past in town carries those humongous Primarni carrier bags. xxx

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  4. In the mid to late 70s, those vintage dresses ex’s were all the rage. Gunny Sax was a prize for my generation. We wore the to our high school graduation evening,. I had a couple of friends wear them as bridal gowns. Bridesmaids loved them

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    1. The Medieval style Gunne Sax dresses sell for £££s these days - not widely available in the UK - I suppose our equivalent was Laura Ashley! x

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  5. I love most of my clothes and have been buying mainly second hand since I was a student. It took years before I could persuade to buy second hand shoes, but when I considered how many pairs of feet had been inside the "new" ones I was buying trying them on before me I eventually got over myself and have never looked back. I decided to "treat" myself to one of the Joe Brown dresses last year with some birthday money. It had been years since I'd bought new, but when it arrived the quality was so dreadful that I sent it back by return. Wasn't a treat at all in the end...lesson learned and the refunded money got spent on lots of second hand goodies. Fabulous colours as ever Vix! Arilx

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    1. Same here! I started buying secondhand as soon as I was old enough to get pocket money. I've still got the Indian slave bracelet I bought from Oxfam for 75p when I was 10!!
      A lot of people are a bit hesitant about buying secondhand footwear but, like you say, how many feet tried them on in shops?
      What a shame about the Joe Brown's dress - I occasionally see adverts for them pop up online and the clothes look lovely - a case of style over substance no doubt. xxx

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  6. where can i sign?
    since over 20 years i did not buy a clothing item in a high street shop. but i have to buy new the shoes, undies and socks/tights - our 2.hand shops only sell very worn or very strange stuff in this range.... don´t ask.
    years ago i un-followed a whole bunch of german fast fashion bloggers after they made a shitstorm against me - i commented on a H&M skirt that i do not need such things made out of blood, sweat & petrol.... ups. i guess i did a "freudsches" thing with the comment - i was feed up with all the tad showing up on my monitor.
    best choice ever - ha! now i only look at blogs i really love - with (mostly) sustainable fashions and attitude.
    the turquoise outfit with the cute dragons is to die for!!!
    xxxxx

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    1. You've got me intrigued by the strange stuff you've seen in your secondhand shops!
      That did make me laugh about the blood, sweat and petrol. Are these women totally deluded not to question where their cheap sh*t comes from or so obsessed with keeping up with the latest trend that they're happy to turn a blind eye? It beggars belief! xxx

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  7. It does make you look like a beautiful butterfly - as a previous IG commenter said. I would estimate that 90% of my clothing is second hand. Less on the shoes but I do find them occasionally. I buy some second hand jewellery, found a beautiful Italian silver necklace last year after our trip to Italy - paid $9 for it. It would have been $100 in Italy. I also buy up Mexican silver as tend to wear alot of it. This week on the used market we bought a patio umbrella ($32), golf putter ($50) and temporary lawnchair for use until next summer ($9). Zero packaging added to the waste pile. And we saved approximately $300! I haven't seen one of my friends in 6 months and she came into town - she is my only thrifting friend who totally gets it. She pointed to her clothing - all thrifted - me too!

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    1. You've done brilliantly with the garden additions, How fab!
      Do you find that after visiting a country and looking at their crafts that you're able to spot them secondhand? It's sad that people must buy these souvenirs for friends and family who don't appreciate them and they end up getting donated but all the better for us! xxx

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  8. That's my favourite kind of recycling! None of my clothes are "onlies", as a matter of fact, I'm always proud to tell people that - at a rough guess - about 90% of what I'm wearing is second hand. Going charity shopping or car booting is always exciting, just because you never know what you'll find! Case in point must be that amazing orange dress with the massive sleeves. And how fabulous are both the "old" and "new" Dollyrockers frocks and the vintage Chinese jacket! xxx

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    1. I can't tell you how excited I get when I know I'm off secondhand shopping/rummaging. I might not get much but that's the thrill, isn't it? It keeps you going back. No such thrill for those who buy from shops where it's all laid out for them, no wonder they go off stuff so quickly. xxx

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  9. What lovely dresses are those Dollyrocker maxi's. You look fabulous in them and I just love your green go go boots, the Chinese jacket and those brilliant clogs. Loved your Dolcis bag and the fab stainless steel jewellery. Good thinking on your part to add the turquoise beads although the abalone shell is beautiful, too.

    I'm not surprised your stockroom is bursting at the seams - do you never come back from a rummage empty handed? All amazing stuff as usual. I have a beautiful green Chinese jacket bought for 5.00 in a charity shop and I just haven't found an occasion to wear it - I must put my thinking cap on!

    It is so true what you're saying about fast fashion. We have so much stuff that comes in to Barnardo's brand new with the tags still from the High Street. On Saturday, in Aylesbury in the Scope charity shop I was chatting to the manager and she had, just that morning, sent 4 plastic sacks of BNWT clothes on to other stores as they are an outlet store and sell things for fixed prices. She said some of BNWT clothes were designer labels. The mind simply boggles...

    Hope you have a lovely week - at least the weather is behaving itself!
    xxxxx

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    1. Thanks, Vronni! I love how those go-go boots go so well with my Dollyrockers frocks - same era, same colour palette!
      Liking the sound of your Chinese jacket.
      I never come back from a rummage empty handed - there's always a book or a bit of haberdashery to be found.
      It is mind boggling what gets donated, isn't it? xxx

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  10. Having recently lost nearly 6 stones in weight (in preparation for my hip replacement op, which I had just over 3 weeks ago - all went wonderfully well and it is amazing to be pain-free after so many years), I've changed clothes size dramatically over the past 18 months. 90% of everything I've bought in smaller sizes have been second-hand - charity shops / boot sales / jumble sales - and what then becomes too big has been sold on ebay. If I'd not been a very keen second-hand clothes wearer anyway I'd have been bankrupt by now!! Love the colours in your new Dollyrockers dress, Vix.

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    1. Hi Elizabeth! Welcome to the hip replacement club! So pleased that you're doing well, they really are life changing, aren't they?
      That's an incredible weight loss, what determination. Love your style too, buying secondhand and making a profit on the stuff that you shrink out of.
      Lovely to hear from you. xxx

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  11. I have been reading recently too about the impact fast fashion is having on both the environment and economy; this is an excellent post - I hope every one of your followers reads and enjoys it; I will be coming back to pick up the links for a more leisurely read. I felt so good wearing my EBay win skirt on my trip to Istanbul this weekend and knowing it didn't cost silly money I didn't worry about losing my suitcase on the way home either! and what's more, as per your recent post - I wore it more than once, didn't wash it and didn't care! we wash stuff far too much in the UK - oh, and I have moved over to using baby shampoo for a lot of my laundry now instead of those expensive, harsh detergents that sap the colour out of everything. Thanks!

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    1. Your eBay skirt looked absolutely fabulous - even though it was an absolute bargain I bet you'd be gutted if it got lost in transit! Here's to wearing, wearing and wearing and less of the obsessive washing! xxx

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  12. Great post as always. I love thrift shopping. I am the one with Cave of Wonders. Recently I found a floor length skirt which I have been craving for $2 US. Being a plus size it is hard finding things in my size. I was overjoyed. It was put on a small size rack. I spotted it thinking it was big for a medium I pulled it out and saw it was my size.Yes!

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    1. Hello darkelady! Is Cave of Wonders an Etsy shop? I can't seem to find it.
      Finding amazing plus sized clothing can be a trial as there's such a demand for it. I'm always looking for cool vintage in larger sizes for my stall.
      Well done on finding the maxi skirt at such an incredible price. I bet you did a happy dance around the shop! xxx

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  13. Love this post vix , When i visited car boot sales i never looked in the piles of clothes on the floor problem is when i get down i can't get up lol , So i must have missed loads It always amazed me the amount of clothing that came through the door when i was a charity shop manager , lots of new stuff with labels on but funnily enough the mens stuff , we had hardly anything worth putting out.

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    1. Ha! I had that trouble before my hip replacement! Most of those piles of clothes aren't worth throwing yourself on the floor for - honest!
      I always say that men of a certain age wear their clothes to death so there's nothing fit to donate to the charity shop. There's still not much in the way of menswear in most of the chazzas and sadly, most of it is Primarni rubbish! xxx

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  14. You are a magnificent butterfly in your winged gown, and oh, that Dollyrockers dress is fantabulous on you, Vix. Those green lace-up boots are causing my jaw to drop! Amen, on not shopping fast fashion! I see so much crap in the thrift stores - it's hard to find anything really good anymore! But, like you, I always seem to find a few things! I am very taken with that stainless steel jewelry (good for subbing out that abalone with the turquoise - love that!). I would wear that all in a heartbeat!

    Happy week to you and Jon and the fur-boys!

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    1. Thanks, Sheila! I just about died when I opened the parcel and discovered those boots. aren't they amazing?
      I do think the choice on the secondhand market is getting poorer - I've read that we could be the last generation to be able to find great quality pieces as more and more people embrace shoddy, fast fashion. I do hope not or we're set fora dull (and badly dressed) retirement! xxx

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  15. geez, was it donate suede skirt day in Britain? Nice haul

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    1. I know - don't find one for an age and they all arrive at once! xxx

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  16. Some things I must purchase new, but they are considered purchases-not just bought on a whim to discard later. The sort of things I like would never turn up in retail anyway (though Gucci has been stealing my look).

    Super finds in those suede mini skirts. I imagine they will be quick sellers with the festival crowd.

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    1. Sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and buy new although how many times do you do just that only to find an near-identical thing turn up secondhand weeks later?
      Suede is a perennial favourite at festivals, it's got that cool but I don't give a damn look about it. Sadly all of them have 24" waists (which can hang around for a eternity)- which might mean I have to borrow them until they're sold! xxx

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  17. I agree, Vix - secondhand shopping is the best! You look fantastic in al three of those amazing dresses. What lucky festival customers - there's some brilliant finds there.

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    1. Thanks so much, Alli! lovely to hear from you. Secondhand is best! xxx

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  18. Meghan said Did you see Duchess Kate at the Flower Show? I saw her lovely dress and hair and I thought of Vix working her magic in front of the lovely house in your recent blog with the beautiful plants. Great minds think alike my mother used to say. Continue to lead the way by your wisdom. This generation needs your knowledge. An amazed fan continues to watch a smart and wise woman for guidance in creativity for taking care of our planet.

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    1. Meghan, that's such a lovely thing to say. I'm not a huge fan of Kate's style but that dress was incredible and I thought she looked absolutely stunning, I'd love to own that dress! xxx

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  19. Meghan said they said the look of Duchess Kate dazzled in their most favorite look on a royal ever. Vix wears the exact look as our favorite and YES Vix you have dazzled for years. Thank you.

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    1. You are wonderfully sweet, thank you! xxx

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  20. Your great finds will certainly make your customers happy. I am quite sure all these wonderful dresses find you rather than the other way round.The orange dress has the best sleeves ever. I agree that second hand is the best way to go but must admit to buying new too , not high street as its not an option here, from small local retailers . I only buy what I really love and will wear for many years to come.

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    1. There's nothing wrong with buying new if they're considered purchases - and yours always are. Anyone can see by your impeccable dress sense that you take great care in the clothes you buy. xxx

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  21. That vintage Jodi T of California maxi dress is a dream and I love the bag you paired it with. The psychedelic print maxi dress is very cool as well. That orange dress with bat sleeves is so dramatic, I love it.

    Our buying habits (as a society) are something that needs evaluating. Second hand is definitely the more ethic choice, especially vintage second hand or at least older second hand. I think some people don't realize there is a difference between vintage second hand and second hand items that were discarded yesterday. There aren't many second hand shops here, so they aren't swamped with tons of clothes from high street brands yet but I fear they will be in the future. A lot of people feel good when they donate clothes, but they never stop to wonder what happens with all those clothing items. Often it is sold to people in Africa who can't afford anything else and as you pointed out it caused the disappearance of local trades and textile production. Can we call something a donation if it gets sold to somebody eventually? Donation would be going to the family in need directly and giving them clothes, but with all the clothes being tossed away and ending up in trash, is there really a need for that kind of donation. I was told by Red cross workers they receive more clothes they can handle. They are required by law (as an International association) to dry clean the clothes they get and it is a huge financial burden for the organization to dry clean clothes that nobody might want.

    The root of the problem is over-consumption I think. If people did shop in high street brands but did so in a way that wouldn't cause them to 'donate' (or better said toss away) clothes all the time, less clothes would end up in the trash and less low quality clothes would be produced and even that would be some progress. The situation right now is really the worst scenario: most people constantly buy and discard unethical and toxic clothing items, thus causing both environmental and economical issues.

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    1. As always a wonderfully well considered and thoughtful comment, Ivana.

      As you rightfully point out, it's not so much a single fast fashion purchase, it's the over consumption. I don't have a problem with anybody seeing something they love advertised in a magazine and going out and buying it and wearing it until it falls apart.

      People joke about going into Primark for one thing and coming out with ten and although I've never shopped there I see the citizens of our town weighed down with huge carrier bags emblazoned with the company name. If it was a single item they were buying they'd have a smaller bag, wouldn't they? Fact is that they see stuff so cheap that they feel they have to have it, realise when they get home that they're never going to wear it and because it was so cheap in the first place don't bother taking it back to the shop hence the reason, I suspect, that it ends up at a charity shop with the labels still attached.
      Interesting point about the donating. I don't think many people give their clothes to charity for altruistic reasons, they simply want rid of it - whether it's to a good cause or dumped in landfill it doesn't matter as long as it's out of their lives. xxx

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  22. Not that my clothing choices are entirely sustainable either. I don't buy from high street brands but I do sometimes accept clothes for review and that's really the same thing as buying from high street brands, isn't it? Especially since most clothes are produced in worrying conditions. I don't blame the bloggers for trying to make a living by collaborating with high street brands, affiliate links or whatever, as I think the main issue is over-consumption and that's a deeply rooted problem that can't be put on bloggers' shoulders. A lot of them have been talking about buying less lately, so maybe there are some positive steps in a new direction. There are many worrying things about high street brands. One thing I try to do is shop my closet and support local brands, I think that's very important too. After the fallout of Yugoslavia, its textile industry pretty much disappeared and that's a huge loss because they really had high quality products. Over the years I watched many Croatian brands go out of business and it's been depressing to say the least. I shopped from them as much as I could, but most people are to lazy to ever thing about things like supporting the local economy or independent artists, they prefer to buy everything from high street brands. Generally speaking, people don't realize that they have a responsibility with how they spend money and that it is something that influences the way this world is really. You can't constantly buy and wear the same things as everyone else and expect independent artisans to survive. It's a bigger issue than clothes, people often buy prints and art that have been stolen from artists just because it's cheaper to get them from mall or whatever.

    People are getting spoiled, they constantly expect something for nothing and they have no appreciation for the work that goes into something. I can't tell you of all the times someone has asked me for free art and not a small illustration or something like that but a big framed olive painting that would be cost me more than a hundred euros in material only or how many times someone asked me to edit or translate a book for them for free. A friend of mine has told me that someone asked her to do catering for 400 people for free. I mean this world is really becoming incredible. We need to get rid of this entitlement and customer first mentality and understand that our choices have consequences.

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    1. I don't know what the secondhand clothing market is like in Croatia but I think you do a great job in incorporating clothes you've had for years or things you've inherited from your family members and by mentioning the origins of your garments on your blog it's giving your readers fresh ideas that not everything they wear has to come brand new from a shop. xxx

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  23. "Taking the recycling out" ha, ha!
    I went further recently and didn't pack clothes when I travelled but bought things secondhand once I arrived. It was such fun!
    You are such a great inspiration of how great you can look in "recycled" clothing. And how fun to think we are helping the planet and giving clothes another life.
    Great post!
    xo Jazzy Jack

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    1. I love the idea of buying secondhand when you arrived at your destination. Not only good to travel light but your purchases must have been very carefully considered, clothes that went with your other finds and were suitable for the here and now. xxx

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  24. Say it again, Vix. And again and again. Look at that amazing butterfly in your garden - oh, it's you in your winged dress! I don't buy any clothing, I make everything and all my shoes come from ebay. But then, where does the fabric, thread, sewing needles, etc. come from?

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    1. That's me, a butterfly! Don't capture me in a net and stick a pin through my heart, will ya?
      I try to only use vintage fabric and thread and notions I've found secondhand but it's harder for you as you make a LOT more than I do! xxx

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  25. Thought of you on Sunday as The Antiques Roadshow was on. It says that collecting tribal jewellery is getting popular and going up in value.

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    1. Malcolm - thank you so much for that. I watched the Roadshow on catch-up last night and was thrilled to see Ronnie (a fellow Pop-up Vintage trader) and his incredible collection. Hope that doesn't mean that it'll get too expensive for me to buy now! xxx

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  26. Love your blog! I've bought second-hand for the last 30 years and enjoy the thrill of the 'hunt' in the charity shops:) You seem to have the knack of finding wonderful things..

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    1. Hello and thank you so much!! Yes, nothing beats the thrill of the hunt, that heart stopping moment when you spot treasure in a sea of dross! Here's to the next 30 years! xxx

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  27. What a fab car..and jacket..and Dollyrockers..and orange dress..and Bolivian waistcoat. Phew, just a feast for the eyes Vix, gorgeous! xxx

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    1. Thanks so much, Sally! I'd love to hear the story behind the Bolivian waistcoat - a drunken gap year purchase maybe? xxx

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  28. While I am worried about the political mess in the US with regard to the tariffs on Chinese goods, I don't think it will personally affect the cost of things I buy because almost all of my purchases are second-hand. I do hope the situation keeps more people from buying cheap Chinese-produced fashion!

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    1. That's a very good point, the less crap imported the less people can buy! xxx

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  29. Great post Vix. I wish more people would wake up and buy secondhand - it just makes so much sense & is sooo satisfying finding that hidden gem. I've recently been working with teenagers and they just accept everything is there to be had at the touch of a button for tuppence. I think back to my teenage years when there was the thrill of waiting and saving for things. We just don't need all this stuff and if we do what's wrong with picking up a secondhand bargain!

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    1. Thanks, Em! Me, too - we need to keep spreading the word, not only is it a million times better for the planet but it's so much more rewarding and, as Porcelina pointed out in her comment, it makes you think creatively. When you shop in normal shops it's all laid out for you, the matching shoes, bag, top...blah, blah, blah. I love finding something, getting it home and holding it up to the wardrobe where the right accompanying thing pops up instantly.
      Keep spreading the word! xxx

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  30. the little hand bag, the vintage dress from Lotte California, and the blue mandarin-collar jacket: I have serious clothes envy for them all. Fantastic.

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  31. Vix, my eyes widened when I saw the Sheffield Stainless Steel choker picture – I love it! How creative of you to replace the missing abalone with turquoise beads, it looks so much better!

    Reading your second paragraph about how much you enjoy secondhand shopping really resonated with me, it’s like you took the words right out of my mouth! I’m sure many other people feel the same way too. Isn’t it lovely that we’ve got a little vintage/secondhand community on here? And you’re such a fab advocate for recycling. X

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    1. Thanks, Jess! keep your eyes peeled for Stainless Steel jewellery, the rings and pendants are so stylish and although the prices are starting to creep up a bit lately they're still affordable.
      I love our secondhand community both here and on IG. Like-minded ladies unite! xxx

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  32. Hi there! I simply want to offer you a big thumbs up for the excellent info you have right
    here on this post. I will be returning to your blog for more soon.

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  33. The Jody T ensemble is exquisite! And should I encounter anything like that Dolci's bag while out and about, I would definitely walk up to the owner and compliment her on her taste (while sneaking a closer look).

    (Forgive my taking my pet hobby horse out for another trot.) I do think discarding home economics from American schools curriculum is at least partly the cause of this "must buy new" mess. Youngsters literally do not know what's involved in the manufacture of clothing; neither do they know how to make or alter their own. Daresay I know many teens who can write code but can't thread a bobbin!

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    1. Thanks, Beth! I'm always excited to find American vintage, so exotic to us!
      I agree about the way kids are taught (or not!) in schools. There needs to be more emphasis on saving up and buying the best you can afford rather than the instant gratification of mass-market, poorly made fast fashion. xxx

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  34. How funny but we just gave a Brearley a lift home after the 30th birthday party we went to. She is CBC's colleague!
    Your new dress is amazing. I always say that eventually I will find anything I wanted first time round in a charity shop. I never hide it when anyone asks where I got my lovely dress/shirt/skirt from- I proudly declare it was secondhand from Charity shop/eBay/Depop/Vinted.
    I do think it is crazy, the amount of awful clothing that is available. When I enter ANY high-street store now (except perhaps M&S), I can SMELL the articificial clothing- the polyester, viscose, Scuba etc and it is killing our earth! I do try to buy second-hand cotton if I can.
    I was really glad speaking to the aforementioned Brearley that she is collecting bras for a community that they did World Challenge with in Africa last year- that means I can dispose of the underwired bras I no longer wear (I only want to wear the unwired ones I bought over the past two years) for a really poor community there. I know the concern over textile cultures being ruined by our substandard exports, it is terrible, but in this case, it is for a charity for HIV families.
    I do love second-hand. I remember my very first charity shop visit when I was about 10. One opened in our suburb and I LOVED it. I bought a sequinned parrot t-shirt (in my parrot phase!), a vintage royal blue satin blouse and a copy of The Pirates of Penzance (forgive me if I told you this already!). My one regret was the day I saw a red polo neck in the window. I had wanted one for ages and was so excited by it but it gone by the time I managed to get there at the weekend with my £2!

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    1. I can't believe you know another Brearley! I wonder if we're related. My Dad's cousin was the England cricket captain, Mike Brearley.
      I saw that bras for Africa campaign on Facebook. I'm not a fan of bras in general and avoid them if at all possible - trouble is a lot of my clothes are on the flimsy side and I don't want to cause a public outrage!
      The fact that you still remember your first chazza purchases just prove how thrilling secondhand shopping is. I bought an Indian bracelet from Oxfam when I was 10 and still have it now! That charity shop regret though, I know it well, missing out on something you had your eye on - eBay's terrible for that especially when IG sellers I follow have the very thing I was outbid on priced at £250! xxx

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  35. I'm horribly aware of how guilty I am of mindlessly shopping the high street in previous years. I feel I am a more careful/thoughtful shopper these days (and there are definitely shops I no longer use) I certainly buy a lot less and I realise it makes me appreciate things more. I'm horrified at how much I used to just buy, buy, buy.

    That aside as ever you have some astonishingly lovely purchases. Mim and I were saying yesterday you and a couple of other blogs we follow are definitely responsible for us both stepping out of our comfort zone and trying out more colour and pattern and loving it!

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    1. Ah well, at least you're out of that cheap and cheerful rut now, it can happen to the best of us.
      I'm so happy that you and Mim are embracing even more colour in your wardrobes, that's the true joy of blogging isn't it? Being inspired to try something new! xxx

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  36. Ahh, I do love this post! (Radostin = jessiejessyg, forgot to mention tho you probably remember anyway xx)

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  37. Yes! As consumers we have a huge power to influence the suppliers. I wish more people realised (or cared) about this fact!
    I do buy new items on occasion but they always get worn a lot. I'm not a buy it, wear it, bin it kinda person. I love charity shopping and much prefer it to high street trawling. My first charity shop purchase was a long cardy that I wore so much. I still have it, it serves as more of an extra layer for when I don't want to put the heating on these days but it's still going strong!
    I think a good rule is that if you're going to refer to something as 'only' then it should stay on the rail... if 'only' we could enforce that rule!
    I had a history teacher called Mr Brearley.
    xx

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  38. You've found some amazing things there - as ever I'd covet the 60s stuff if it fitted! That turquoise suede number is fab.

    I do find the terrible quality of stuff on the high street shocking. I'm not a fan of the Instagram 'wear it once' culture. (Then again, I tend to unfollow accounts that are just photos of the person looking immaculate all the time - I like people who DO things! No-one can be beautiful if they're boring; interesting people are kaleidoscopically beautiful.)

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